Gender quality is such an important movement and I think equality amongst the sexes is something we’ve noticed increasingly acceptable in the past few years. Even if it’s starting to get more acceptable, the job’s never done so I understand why it’s still being talked about because it still needs to be talked about.
Chris Talbot, Bandwagon (via wildbeastsfans)

(via wildbeastsfans)


we’re all one sexuality

firemen:

the human sexuality <3 end straight hate…

(via sansaslays)




letsuncreatehate:

Jack White being a lyrical master

(via lovealwaysalison)


ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks &lt;3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^


fuckyeahchandlerbing:

AGAIN. 

AGAIN.

(via sonicmeplease)


surfacen0ise:

beatastic:

Listen/purchase: Anti-matter by beatastic

The new album out 14-09-14

Buy it here/pre-order : https://beatastic.bandcamp.com

$1 for 10 songs or name your own price. I’ve tried to keep the price as low as possible but feel free to pay what you think it deserves. Thanks all for your support <3

REBLOG AND SHARE SUPPORT INDEPENDENT ARTISTS

REBLOG AND SHARE SUPPORT INDEPENDENT ARTISTS

REBLOG AND SHARE SUPPORT INDEPENDENT ARTISTS

REBLOG AND SHARE SUPPORT INDEPENDENT ARTISTS

REBLOG AND SHARE SUPPORT INDEPENDENT ARTISTS

For fans of THE CURE, QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE, FOALS, THE HORRORS, MY BLOODY VALENTINE, SMASHING PUMPKINS etc…

Check this out. Album released tomorrow.

(via just-a-hopeless-wanderer)


drjimmypage:

Steal his look&#160;: Jimmy Page
TOPMAN Makahiki Hawaiian Short Sleeve Shirt $89.63
Barneys Simon Miller vintage light blue denim Highland boyfriend jeans $315
Saint Laurent ‘Lulu’ Oxford - $675
Ogilvie at home perm kit - $8.99


dustandoldguitars

drjimmypage:

Steal his look : Jimmy Page

  • TOPMAN Makahiki Hawaiian Short Sleeve Shirt $89.63
  • Barneys Simon Miller vintage light blue denim Highland boyfriend jeans $315
  • Saint Laurent ‘Lulu’ Oxford - $675
  • Ogilvie at home perm kit - $8.99
dustandoldguitars

(via just-a-hopeless-wanderer)


hail-merome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

writeroffates:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

wonderhawk:

universitybookstore:

This year’s Banned Books Week is officially September 21-27, but we Seattle-ites have been celebrating banned and challenged books all month long. Some of our favorite books happen to be frequently challenged titles (funny how that happens, isn’t it?), and we love a good opportunity to celebrate both freedom of speech and a great story. See below for some of the banned/challenged books we’re sharing in our Children’s Book department as well as the reasons they were banned. (Also check out the American Library Association website for more frequently banned titles by decade.)

- And Tango Makes Three by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson. Reasons: Homosexuality, unsuited for age group.

- In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak. Reasons: nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit.

- Captain Underpants (series) by Dav Pilkey. Reasons: Offensive language, anti-family content, violence, unsuited for age group.

- Bone (series) by Jeff Smith. Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence.

- Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George. Reasons: unsuited to age group, violence.

- The Golden Compass (His Dark Materials trilogy) by Philip Pullman. Reasons: political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, and violence.

- ttyl by Lauren Myracle. Reasons: offensive language; religious viewpoint; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group.

- Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher. Reasons: homosexuality and offensive language.

- The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group.

Junie B. Jones? Really?! My second grade teacher read us every single book of that series and I ended up buying the series in third grade. These books define my childhood!

Someone actually banned ‘Captain Underpants’

I swear to glob I genuinely weep for us as a species when I see just how stupid some human beings truly are…

Who the fuck banned the very hungry caterpillar?! What could any one have against a bug that just wants to eat?!

It promotes the CATERPILLAR AGENDA O.O

Ttyl!? Like yeah it has sexually explicit shit but that’s because they’re HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. A LOT OF GIRLS IN HIGH SCHOOL DO THE SEX. It even promotes safe sex as far as I can remember. Sheesh that book and the other few in the series are my lifeee

(via just-a-hopeless-wanderer)